Category Archives: 2 Government

American Civil Rights – A Glance back at the Movement

Assignment is worth 100 points (50 on the bullets and 50 on the journal) due posted to Schoology.  71296-004-0B8CB497You may work with a partner – see directions below.  In order to spread our studies across the spectrum – we will have no more than one group working on a particular topic.  Email me your choice of topic along with partner’s names if you are working as a group – first come first serve…

The Civil Rights Movement will serve as the core to our study of Government.  The Fourteenth Amendment lies at the center of that movement.  We will look hard at each and the relationship between the two. Continue reading

Comments Off on American Civil Rights – A Glance back at the Movement

Filed under 2 Government

2016/17 Government Final Exam Review

Podcasts for Bill of Rights Declaration of Independence and 14th Amendment.

The Final for Government will take place during the regular Exam period – third period on Thursday and sixth period on Friday.  The exam will consist of multiple choice and short essay.  The Multiple choice questions will constitute 50% of the grade and cover the Bill of Rights and 13, 14, 15 amendments and the issues that shape those amendments.  Short essays (five of seven) will focus on the Declaration of Independence, however may draw from a couple of questions on the amendments.  Each of the multiple choice questions will be character limited.  To study for the final review each of the podcasts posted below.

1 – Declaration of Independence (1776)

Below are audio podcasts to help you better understand the Declaration of Independence.  Each is between two and four minutes long.   The Declaration document (and subsequent podcasts) are broken into an Introduction – seven individual stanza’s – and a Conclusion.  The layout corresponds with the required memorization of the Declaration.  Please go here to find the color coded copy of the document.

2 – Bill of Rights (1791)

Below are audio podcasts to help you better understand the each of the civil liberties protected in the Bill of Rights.  Each is between two and four minutes long. Please go here to find a copy of the Bill of Rights.

  1. Religion, Speech, Press, Petititon, Assembly
  2. A Right to Bear Arms
  3. Quartering of Soldiers
  4. Search & Siezure
  5. Due Process Rights
  6. Criminal Procedings
  7. Civil Cases
  8. Bail and Punishment
  9. All Other Rights
  10. States Rights

3  – 14th Amendment to the Constitution (1865)

Below are audio podcasts to help you better understand the 14th Amendment and the historical context in which it was added to the Constitution.  Each is between two and four minutes long.  Please go here to find a copy of Amendment 14.  You are responsible for Section #1 only.

 

Comments Off on 2016/17 Government Final Exam Review

Filed under 2 Government, Uncategorized

The Declaration of Independence

Above, the dramatic recreation of the vote for Independence in the HBO mini-series John Adams. Below the official trailer for the movie.  

Below, a series of podcasts that should help you better understand the meaning of the Declaration of Independence. Each is between two and four minutes long.   The Declaration document (and subsequent podcasts) are broken into an Introduction – seven individual stanza’s – and a Conclusion.  The layout corresponds with the required memorization of the Declaration.  Please go here to find the color coded copy of the document.

Continue reading

Comments Off on The Declaration of Independence

Filed under 2 Government

The Bill of Rights to the U.S. Constitution

The podcasts below will provide you an effective overview for each of the first ten amendments to the United States Constitution.  These amendments were added (1791) to the document four years after it was written (1787) and two years following ratification.  Together they served as a promise fulfilled by the Federalists who sought a strong central Unknown-2government, to the Anti-Federalists who were skeptical.  In order to garner enough support for ratification, the Anti-Federalists insisted on an insurance policy.  This is it; modeled after the Virginal Bill of Rights.

In 1868, following the American Civil War, the 14th amendment is adopted.  This amendment serves to incorporate the protections of the Bill of Rights into every state.  The Civil Rights movement (1954 to 1968) used the first amendment, bolstered by the promises of 14 to gain real freedom for African Americans through out the South.

There are many times in our nations history where the rights of 14 and the first ten are limited by the governments at the State and Federal level. However, because these amendments are enshrined in the Constitution, and due to continual judicial oversight, the rights of the people under these protections eventually carry the day.

  1. Religion, Speech, Press, Petititon, Assembly
  2. A Right to Bear Arms
  3. Quartering of Soldiers
  4. Search & Siezure
  5. Due Process Rights
  6. Criminal Procedings
  7. Civil Cases
  8. Bail and Punishment
  9. All Other Rights
  10. States Rights

Comments Off on The Bill of Rights to the U.S. Constitution

Filed under 2 Government

R-U-AWAKE?

RUAwake

Comments Off on R-U-AWAKE?

Filed under 1 Senior Current Issues, 2 Government, 3 Economics